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The OR 138E Corridor Solutions project will bring some big changes to downtown Roseburg. This online open house explains how the project will affect you.

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The OR 138E Corridor Solutions project will improve safety and the flow of traffic between Interstate 5 and Diamond Lake Boulevard in downtown Roseburg. In this online open house you can learn what the project will look like when it’s completed and how construction will affect traffic.

This open house includes maps, photo galleries and videos of ODOT staff and community members describing how this project addresses several problems. There are seven stations where you can learn about new traffic features and other project elements.

Project Information

Where do you want to go?

Get a list of all the project features and a map of the project area before diving into the details.
Find out why ODOT is doing this project and what the area will look like when construction is completed.
Learn about the project schedule, look over our staging plan and discover how road work will affect you.
Small changes can make a big difference. See how this project will help improve traffic safety.
Find out how this project will make it easier and safer to get around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.
Discover how this project will make downtown Roseburg a more attractive place to visit.
The best way to avoid delays is to stay informed. Find out how to get the latest project updates.

Project Overview

The OR 138E Corridor Solutions project will improve safety and the flow of traffic between Interstate 5 and Diamond Lake Boulevard in downtown Roseburg.

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Project Overview Map

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  • Project Overview Map

    Project Overview Map

Project Goal: This multimodal project will promote economic development, safety and community livability in downtown Roseburg by improving the flow of traffic along the Oregon 138E corridor and adding features that benefit tourists, bicyclists, pedestrians and the disabled.

Project Elements

  • Consolidate the north end of the downtown couplet, where Pine and Stephens meet Washington, into a single intersection by realigning Pine Street;
  • Improve the turning radius at the Pine and Stephens intersections with Douglas, Washington and Oak;
  • Reconfigure the travel lanes on Stephens and Oak to reduce the need for unnecessary lane changes;
  • Increase capacity by constructing dual turn lanes from northbound and southbound Stephens onto Washington;
  • Construct new turn lanes at other locations in the project area;
  • Realign Spruce Street at Oak Avenue so the north leg of Spruce leads directly into the south leg;
  • Upgrade six sets of traffic signals in the downtown area and introduce new features that discourage red-light running;
  • Replace old traffic signs and add overhead directional signage throughout the project limits;
  • Upgrade the rail crossings on Douglas, Washington and Oak Avenue;
  • Install a multiuse path that along Harvard and Oak Avenue that connects the fairgrounds path with the downtown area;
  • Promote connectivity by expanding the bike and pedestrian network onto Spruce Street and Douglas Avenue, connecting it with the paved path to Gaddis Park;
  • Improve or add sidewalks throughout project limits;
  • Add pedestrian refuges at the Stephens-Diamond Lake Boulevard intersection;
  • Construct a bus pullout at the west end of the Washington Avenue bridge;
  • Replace streetlights throughout the project area, and install new lighting along Riverside Park, between the Oak and Washington Avenue Bridges;
  • Install several decorative features that complement the city’s streetscape, such as bridge rail, old-fashioned lampposts, riverview outlooks and bridge monuments;
  • Resurface the Oak and Washington Avenue Bridges and the Deer Creek  Bridge on Stephens;
  • Repair or replace drainage throughout the work zone;
  • Grind and repave the entire project area for the first time in 40 years.

Find out more about this project's road and traffic features, bike-ped improvements, crash reduction efforts and "Enhancement" features.

Construction

Unless the contractor changes the staging plan, construction will begin in July 2015 at the northeast corner of the project area, near the Stephens and Diamond Lake Boulevard intersection, and will gradually move west toward I-5. All construction is scheduled to be completed by fall 2016.

In general, all roads will remain at least partly open at all times. There may be a few nighttime detours when workers are resurfacing the bridges or paving an intersection. ODOT will notify the public before these impacts occur. At other times, motorists should expect single-lane closures, congestion and delays at peak travel times. ODOT encourages motorists to plan ahead, give yourself extra travel time and use alternate routes to avoid congestion.

Find out more about construction and traffic impacts.

Where do you want to go?

Project Overview - Project highlights.

Problems and Solutions - Why is ODOT doing this project?

Construction and Traffic Impacts - How road work will affect you.

Crash Reduction Features - How this project will help improve safety.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features - Getting around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.

Enhancement Features - Improving the downtown experience for everyone.

Stay Informed - Get the latest project information and updates.

Problems and Solutions

Roseburg has changed a lot in the last 40 years, but the downtown transportation system hasn’t kept pace. This project will address several ongoing safety and traffic problems.

Video: Problems and Solutions; 2 min 16 sec
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  • Washington Avenue at Pine and Stephens

    Washington Avenue at Pine and Stephens

    One of the biggest changes this project will bring about is realigning the two block section of Pine Street between Douglas and Oak, and combining Pine and Stephens into one intersection at Washington Street.
  • At present, the Pine and Stephens intersections on Washington are only about a hundred feet apart and there is little available storage space for vehicles, particularly large trucks turning from northbound Stephens onto Washington.
  • Our solution is to shift Pine Street about a hundred feet to the east so that it doesn’t break off from Stephens until south of Washington Avenue. A combined intersection, controlled by a single traffic signal system, will improve safety and help traffic move more efficiently. Also, new overhead directional signage at this intersection, and elsewhere in the project area, will help guide motorists into the correct lane. (NOTE: The new Washington-Stephens intersection is in the center of the image.)
  • Spruce Street

    Spruce Street

    Another problem we see is at the intersection of Oak and Spruce. The north leg of Spruce enters Oak about a hundred feet east of the south leg. Since Oak is a one-way (eastbound) street, motorists traveling south on Spruce cannot legally or safely cross Oak to reach the south leg of Spruce since they would have to travel against one-way traffic.
  • The OR 138 Corridor Solutions project will resolve this problem by realigning the north leg of Spruce so that it lines up with the south leg. This will allow motorists on Spruce to safely cross Oak.
  • "Lane Trap" on Stephens

    "Lane Trap" on Stephens

    The intersection of Diamond Lake Boulevard and Stephens Street can be confusing for many tourists, and some locals, too. The main problem is that the two lanes from Diamond Lake Boulevard turning south are directed into the left and middle lanes on Stephens. Many of these vehicles are heading to I-5, so motorists are required to make an additional lane change to get in the far right lane to reach I-5. Every time a driver makes a lane change, there’s the potential for a crash. We want to reduce the number of lane changes people have to make.
  • So the first thing we are going to do is restripe Stephens so that there are only two southbound lanes immediately south of the Diamond Lake intersection. The striping, along with new directional signing, will guide both lanes that are turning south from Diamond Lake into what are now the middle and right lanes of Stephens. A third southbound lane, to the left of the other two, will open up about halfway between Diamond Lake Boulevard and Douglas Avenue.
  • Dual turn lanes

    Dual turn lanes

    Now that we have guided southbound Diamond Lake Boulevard traffic into the middle and right lanes of southbound Stephens, we want to give both lanes the option of turning onto Washington and toward I-5. After we have realigned Pine Street, the old section of Pine immediately adjacent to Rite-Aid will become a dual right-turn lane onto Washington. This means that whatever lane you were in on Diamond Lake Boulevard, you will be able to turn right on Washington without having to make any lane changes on Stephens.
  • Bus pullout

    Bus pullout

    The last obstacle that drivers face while traveling from Diamond Lake Boulevard to I-5 is at the west end of the Washington Avenue Bridge. Between the end of the bridge and Madrone Street, UTrans buses frequently stop to pick up passengers, forcing traffic in the right lane to stop. This project will construct a bus pullout at the west end of the bridge, allowing both lanes coming off the bridge to keep moving while the bus pulls over.
  • Oak Avenue

    Oak Avenue

    Motorists traveling the opposite way, from I-5 to Diamond Lake Boulevard, also encounter some obstacles. Most of the drivers heading east on Oak will eventually turn left onto Stephens, but the striping is set up so that half of the traffic coming off the Oak Avenue Bridge will be trapped in the right lane, which continues straight at the Stephens intersection. This forces drivers to make more lane changes and increases the potential for a crash.
  • New lane configuration

    New lane configuration

    To correct this problem, the travel lanes will be restriped so that traffic coming off the Oak Avenue Bridge will, by default, enter the left and middle lanes. On the right side, a right-turn lane will open up between Parrot and Spruce. All traffic in this lane will be required to turn right onto Pine. A large curb extension at the southeast corner of Pine and Oak will prevent anyone from continuing straight. Overhead directional signing will help direct drivers into the correct lane.
  • Oak at Stephens

    Oak at Stephens

    After passing Pine Street, the traffic pattern on Oak will remain the same as always. Motorists in the left lane will be required to turn left, drivers in the right lane will be required to continue straight, while those in the center lane can either turn left or go straight.
  • Turning onto Stephens

    Turning onto Stephens

    Most trucks turning from Oak onto Stephens seem to be heading toward Diamond Lake Boulevard, so they usually turn from the center lane of Oak into the right lane of Stephens. Still, ODOT plans to shave back the sidewalk on the inside corner to make it easier for vehicles to turn from the left lane of Oak onto Stephens.
  • Stephens at Washington

    Stephens at Washington

    At this point, most vehicles that turned left from Oak onto Stephens are probably going to continue north. But many drivers from south Roseburg heading north on Stephens will want to turn left onto Washington, toward Roseburg High School and I-5. At peak travel times, the left-turn lane gets backed up at this intersection and it can be difficult to clear all vehicles in one traffic signal cycle.
  • Dual turn lanes

    Dual turn lanes

    To accommodate all of the drivers who want to turn from northbound Stephens onto Washington, ODOT will add a second left-turn lane on Stephens.
  • Turn lanes at Douglas

    Turn lanes at Douglas

    Continuing north on Stephens, drivers will soon have the option of turning left onto Douglas to reach Oregon Tool or the back entrance of Rite-Aid. A turning lane from southbound Stephens onto Douglas will give motorists another option to reach the Douglas County Courthouse or the Jackson Street shopping and entertainment area.
  • Old rail crossing

    Old rail crossing

    One of the least pleasant experiences in the downtown area is driving over the bumpy railroad crossings on Douglas, Washington and Oak. This project will upgrade all three rail crossings and add smooth concrete panels on Douglas and Oak.
  • Damaged pavement

    Damaged pavement

    Oregon 138 between Diamond Lake Boulevard and the Oak and Washington Avenue Bridges was last paved in the 1970s, and several areas are showing obvious signs of wear and tear. This project will repave and stripe the entire work zone, from I-5 to Fowler Street on Diamond Lake Boulevard.
  • Deer Creek Bridge

    Deer Creek Bridge

    Although extensive improvements are planned for the Oak Avenue Bridge, the Washington Avenue Bridge and the Deer Creek Bridge on Stephens will also be resurfaced and receive other repairs.
  • Traffic signs

    Traffic signs

    In addition to replacing old or damaged traffic signs, this project will install large directional signs in several locations.

Some of the pavement along Highway 138 in downtown Roseburg dates back to the 1970s. On the state highway system, asphalt is usually repaved every 10 to 20 years, so it’s rare to find an area where the blacktop is so old. And it shows. The section of Washington Avenue near the railroad tracks is cracked and rutted from 40 years of wear and tear.

Paving this area is long overdue, but it can be expensive to resurface roads. In recent years, similar downtown paving projects in Bandon, Coos Bay, North Bend and Reedsport have cost millions of dollars. Even if the OR 138E Corridor Solutions project did nothing but grind and pave all of the existing roadway from curb to curb, it would still be an expensive project.

Problems with the system

Roseburg has changed a lot in the last 40 years, but the downtown transportation system is still stuck in the 1970s. Traffic often backs up, roads can be difficult to navigate, and there are problems with capacity and turning movements. Many downtown crashes are related to red-light runners and drivers making abrupt lane changes. There are gaps in the bike-ped network, making it difficult for elderly pedestrians, kids on bikes and veterans in wheelchairs to get around.

Proposed solutions

We now have an opportunity to address these problems. The OR 138E Corridor Solutions will make several improvements to the local transportation system. Some of the biggest include:

  • Pine Street realignment: A two-block section of Pine Street will be realigned between Douglas and Oak Avenue, and the Pine and Stephens intersections on Washington will be combined into one. This will improve safety and the flow of traffic by eliminating one unnecessary traffic signal from the system.
  • Spruce Street realignment: Roseburg drivers frequently use side roads to get around congested intersections, and one of the most popular is Spruce Street. This project will realign the north end of Spruce so that it flows directly into the south end at the Oak Avenue intersection. This will improve safety and the flow of traffic.
  • Dual turn lanes: To improve capacity and reduce congestion, dual turn lanes will be built on Stephens for both northbound and southbound traffic turning onto Washington.
  • Turn lanes onto Douglas: At the request of the City of Roseburg, this project will build a northbound and southbound turn lane from Stephens onto Douglas Avenue. This will make it easier for drivers to go to the Douglas County Courthouse and downtown businesses.
  • Right onto Pine: A new right-turn only lane will be installed from Oak Avenue onto Pine Street. The intersection at Oak and Pine is one of the most dangerous in Roseburg, and the new turn lane will help improve safety and the flow of traffic.
  • Preventing “lane trap”: Motorists often make abrupt and dangerous lane changes when they find themselves trapped in the wrong lane. To help drivers get in the correct lane, the travel lanes on Stephens and Oak will be adjusted and new directional signage will be installed.
  • Traffic signals: Six sets of traffic signals in the downtown area will be upgraded. The wire spans at the Diamond Lake-Stephens intersection will be replaced with poles that have mast arms, which are more stable in windy conditions. The signals will be equipped with camera detectors, which are usually more reliable than pavement sensors. Some of the new downtown traffic signals will be equipped with “tattle-tale” devices that make it easier for police officers to identify red-light runners.
  • New signs: Old and damaged traffic signs will be replaced. This project will install new overhead directional signs that will help motorists navigate the downtown area.
  • Bus pullout: A pullout will be constructed at the west end of the Washington Avenue Bridge, allowing both lanes of traffic to keep moving off the bridge when UTrans buses are stopped.
  • Bridge repairs: The Deer Creek Bridge on Stephens will receive several repairs, and the bumpy deck will be resurfaced. The Washington Avenue Bridge will also be resurfaced and the bike lane will be widened.

Bike-ped improvements: The project also includes several important improvements to the local bike-ped network. A new multiuse path will be built from Harvard Avenue to Spruce Street, connecting the fairgrounds multiuse path with the downtown area. On Oak Avenue Bridge, the path will be 10 feet wide, providing plenty of room for pedestrians, bicyclists and wheelchair users. New streetlights will be installed on the bridge and elsewhere in the project area, helping to improve safety. New bicycle lanes will be added throughout the project area. Old and damaged sidewalks will be replaced, and the new railroad crossings on Douglas, Washington and Oak will feature new wrap-around sidewalks.

Enhance improvements: Working with the City of Roseburg, ODOT plans to make several improvements that will benefit the greater community and local businesses, making downtown Roseburg a more attractive place for people to visit and for locals to rediscover. Some of these, such as the turn lanes from Stephens onto Douglas, the bus pullout at the end of the Washington Avenue Bridge and the multiuse path have already been mentioned. At the request of the City of Roseburg, the multiuse path will feature decorative rail, old-fashioned streetlamps and two riverview overlooks on the Oak Avenue Bridge, allowing pedestrians to pause and enjoy the scenery. The project will also install two decorative monuments at the west end of the Oak and Washington Avenue bridges. Similar monuments can be found on bridges throughout Oregon.

Where do you want to go?

Project Overview - Project highlights.

Problems and Solutions - Why is ODOT doing this project?

Construction and Traffic Impacts - How road work will affect you.

Crash Reduction Features - How this project will help improve safety.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features - Getting around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.

Enhancement Features - Improving the downtown experience for everyone.

Stay Informed - Get the latest project information and updates.

Construction and Traffic Impacts

Road work usually brings congestion and delays, but you’ll still be able to get to wherever you want to go.

Video: Construction & Traffic Impacts; 1 min 44 sec
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Staging Map

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  • Staging Map

    Staging Map

The OR138E Corridor Solutions project will begin in July 2015 and continue for approximately 14 months. Most construction will take place on the roads and bridges between the Stephens/Diamond Lake Boulevard intersection and Interstate 5. The project will realign parts of two roads, replace sidewalks, build turn lanes, add a multiuse path, repair three bridges, add streetlights and make several other transportation improvements.

On any given day, more than 20,000 vehicles pass through this part of downtown Roseburg. With so many cars on the road, it is impossible to build a project of this size without affecting traffic. ODOT understands how important it is to keep traffic moving through the work zone, and we are doing everything we can to keep impacts to a minimum.

During project development, ODOT organized a staging plan that would allow a contractor to build the project in a way that would keep traffic moving.

Each contractor brings their own unique experience and ideas to a project, and they often suggest changes to the original staging plan. Most are small changes. Although it’s possible for a contractor to create an entirely new staging plan, they usually stick close to the original plan because construction is sequenced so that certain tasks must be completed before others can begin. So while some details may change, the overall contours of the original staging plan will likely remain the same.

Prior to construction, some utility work will be scheduled. The City of Roseburg will relocate and replace water mains that are in conflict with the project.

The OR138E Corridor Solutions project bids in May 2015, and construction is not expected to begin until after Graffiti Weekend (July 8-12). We do not have a detailed timeline for when each stage will take place or how long it will need, and some stages may overlap. But construction will likely follow the sequence outlined below:

Stage 1: Stephens Street (Deer Creek Bridge to Diamond Lake Boulevard) – Repair the deck of Deer Creek Bridge and replace sidewalks along Stephens Street.

Stage 2: Stephens Street (Diamond Lake Boulevard to Douglas) – Install drainage pipe down center of road at night; excavate and widen road; install new sidewalks. On Harvard, replace sidewalk ramps by Roseburg High School and the northbound Interstate 5 off-ramp.

Stage 3: South and west of Stephens/Douglas intersection – Widens northbound Stephens to provide enough room to build left-turn lane onto Douglas; rebuilds retaining wall next to old Safeway parking lot; builds sidewalks.

Stage 4: Douglas and Spruce (from railroad tracks to Oak Avenue) – Realigns the north leg of Spruce Street at the Oak Avenue intersection; completes Douglas Avenue railroad crossing; builds sidewalks along Spruce and Douglas; creates bike/ped path from Spruce/Washington intersection to the Riverside Park walking path.

Stage 5: Pine and Stephens Streets (from Douglas to Oak) and Washington from Stephens to Spruce – Builds new alignment for Pine Street, adds turn lanes from Stephens onto Washington, rebuilds sidewalks, replaces rail crossing  on Washington. During this stage, at least one lane of Pine Street will remain open at all times. As the new Pine Street alignment is completed, it will be tied into the old alignment one lane at a time.

Stage 6: Harvard and Oak Avenue (from I-5 to Spruce Street) – Constructs multiuse path along Harvard and Oak, builds riverview outlooks and repairs deck on Oak Avenue Bridge, installs streetlights on bridge and along multiuse path.

Stage 7: Washington Avenue Bridge – Repairs deck of Washington Avenue Bridge, installs streetlights.

Stage 8: Entire project area – Builds bus pullout and sidewalks at west end of Washington Avenue Bridge; paves top layer of asphalt across entire project area, installs striping and road signs.

In general, most work will take place during the day when there is more light and it is safer. Some work that could have a high impact on local traffic, such as bridge construction or connecting the new Pine Street alignment to Washington and Oak Avenue, will likely be scheduled at night.

Aside from a few nights, no detours are planned. At most times, traffic impacts will be limited to single-lane closures (both day and night), which may cause congestion and delays at peak travel times for a few days. When this congestion takes place, we expect most local drivers will seek out side roads and take alternate routes. As a result, people who live or own businesses along side streets can expect to see increased traffic from time to time.

Since most sidewalks will be replaced at some point during construction, there will be impacts to pedestrians. At most times, however, at least one side of the street will be passable and pedestrians should watch for construction and walking detour signs.

Likewise, there will be impacts to bicyclists. At most times, we encourage bikers to use alternate routes and side roads. However, when construction is taking place on the Oak or Washington Avenue bridges, bicyclists may either need to walk their bikes or ride in the travel lanes.

Downtown residents and businesses should expect daytime and nighttime noise consistent with road work.

Where do you want to go?

Project Overview - Project highlights.

Problems and Solutions - Why is ODOT doing this project?

Construction and Traffic Impacts - How road work will affect you.

Crash Reduction Features - How this project will help improve safety.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features - Getting around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.

Enhancement Features - Improving the downtown experience for everyone.

Stay Informed - Get the latest project information and updates.

Crash Reduction Features

Small changes can make a big difference. Find out how this project will help improve traffic safety in downtown Roseburg.

Video: Crash Reduction Features; 2 min 38 sec
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  • Stephens at Diamond Lake

    Stephens at Diamond Lake

    Most of the traffic signals in the downtown area are decades old. This project will replace six sets of signals in the project area. The wire spans at the Diamond Lake-Stephens intersection will be replaced with poles that have mast arms, which are more stable in windy conditions.
  • Red light runners

    Red light runners

    Some the worst crashes downtown take place at intersections, and are often the result of drivers running red lights. Although some people intentionally run red lights, others may have trouble seeing the signals. Combining Stephens and Pine into one intersection on Washington will help make things less confusing for drivers.
  • Camera sensors

    Camera sensors

    Some motorcycle riders and bicyclists lose patience with signals that seem stuck and run red lights. The problem is that traditional pavement sensors sometimes do not detect motorcycles or bikes. All of the new signals in the project area will be equipped with camera sensors, which have a better track record at detecting bikes and motorcycles.
  • Tattle-tale lights

    Tattle-tale lights

    To help the Roseburg police discourage red-light runners, some of the new traffic signals will be equipped with “tattle-tale” lights on the back. When the signal is red, the tattle-tale lights are illuminated, allowing police officers to monitor intersections from several different vantage points, even when they can’t see the red signal. According to the Daly City Police in California, the tattle-tale lights have helped decrease red-light running by 25 percent.

In 2012, ODOT conducted a road safety audit to gain a better understanding of the traffic patterns, needs and operational problems along the OR138E corridor in downtown Roseburg. The audit focused on the area of OR 138E (Oak, Washington and Stephens) between Spruce Street and Washington Avenue. Based on ODOT’s Safety Priority Index System, this segment was identified for further analysis because it fell within the top five percent of all segments in the state.

The audit considered all reported crashes in this area during a five-year period, from January 2007 to December 2011 (crashes only need to be reported when the damage exceeds $1,500).

The overwhelming majority or reported crashes, 155 out of 189, occurred at intersections, with red-light running being identified as the main cause. Other crashes at intersections involved turning movements and rear-end collisions. Another 18 crashes took place in straight areas and were a result of sideswipes, which often happens when drivers are changing lanes. A handful of other crashes involved fixed objects and pedestrians.

From this data, the audit identified three safety issues that could to be addressed:

  1. Reducing red-light running
  2. Improving turning radiuses and visibility at intersections
  3. Eliminating “lane trap” and reducing the need to change lanes.

To address red-light running issues, the project will include modifications or replacement of traffic signals, which will make them more visible to drivers. The new signals will use camera detection, which typically perform better than pavement sensors in identifying motorcycles and bicycles. Also, “tattle-tale” beacons will be installed on some of the downtown traffic signals, allowing police officers to identify red-light runners from several different vantage points. Tattle-tale lights have only recently been introduced to Oregon, but they are in widespread use elsewhere, including Daly City, California.

The project will modify intersections to make it easier to turn and to improve visibility for all drivers. New or additional turn lanes will be constructed at several locations within the project area, and additional overhead directional signage will be installed.

The lane trap phenomenon leads to much of the sideswiping that occurs in the downtown area. Vehicles heading from Diamond Lake Boulevard to I-5 are currently guided into the left and middle lanes of southbound Stephens, but they will need to get into the right lane to turn onto Washington Avenue and reach I-5. Once they realize they are trapped in the wrong lane, drivers may make an abrupt lane change and sideswipe another vehicle. This project will reconfigure the lanes on Stephens and add directional signage and corresponding striping so that drivers can get from Diamond Lake Boulevard to I-5 with fewer lane changes.

Where do you want to go?

Project Overview - Project highlights.

Problems and Solutions - Why is ODOT doing this project?

Construction and Traffic Impacts - How road work will affect you.

Crash Reduction Features - How this project will help improve safety.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features - Getting around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.

Enhancement Features - Improving the downtown experience for everyone.

Stay Informed - Get the latest project information and updates.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features

This project has several features that will make it easier and safer for pedestrians, kids on bikes and wheelchair users to get around.

Video: Bike/Pedestrian Features; 1 min 50 sec
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  • Multiuse path

    Multiuse path

    In recent years, ODOT and the City of Roseburg have built several pedestrian and bicycle paths with the intention of one day connecting them into a city-wide bike-ped network. This project will bring that goal one step closer to reality by constructing a multiuse path along Harvard and Oak Avenue that links the Fairground paths to the downtown area.
  • Oak Avenue Bridge

    Oak Avenue Bridge

    Built in 1970, the Oak Avenue Bridge carries traffic across the Umpqua River, from I-5 to the downtown area. The new multiuse path will connect with the Fairgrounds path near Roseburg High School, follow Harvard across the Oak Avenue Bridge and connect with bike lanes on the other side of the river.
  • The existing sidewalk on the Oak Avenue Bridge provides enough space for two people to pass, but not much room for bicycles or wheelchairs. Nor is there much room for people to pause and enjoy the view of the river below.
  • When the project is completed, the Oak Avenue Bridge will feature a 10-foot-wide multiuse path, similar to the one seen in the drawing, which will provide more space for pedestrians, bicyclists and wheelchair users.
  • Viewing areas

    Viewing areas

    This project will also construct two viewing areas along the bridge’s multiuse path. Each viewing area will be about 12 feet long and four feet wide, giving plenty of room for sightseers to pause and look around or take pictures. These viewing areas will be similar to the ones on the pedestrian bridge between Roseburg and Green.
  • The viewing areas will allow people to see things in the river they usually miss, such as these bufflehead ducks feeding below the bridge.
  • New rail

    New rail

    At the request of the City of Roseburg, this project will include several features that complement the city’s unique streetscape. In addition to the new viewing areas, decorative pedestrian rail will be installed on the Oak Avenue Bridge.
  • Monuments

    Monuments

    The Corridor Solutions project will install decorative monuments at the west end of the Oak and Washington Avenue Bridges, welcoming visitors to the downtown area. Similar monuments can be found on bridge approaches throughout Oregon. The monuments, which are still in the design stage, are being created by Oregon artists and will reflect the city’s streetscape themes.
  • Lampposts

    Lampposts

    Adding to the new look of the Oak Avenue Bridge, old-fashioned streetlights will be installed along the multiuse path.
  • Park lighting

    Park lighting

    The Riverside Park walking path between the Oak and Washington Avenue Bridges is one of the lesser known treasures in downtown Roseburg. This project will install lampposts along the path so that more people can feel safe and enjoy the area after work or in the early evening.
  • Bike lanes

    Bike lanes

    Although there are currently bicycle lanes on Harvard and parts of Oak and Washington, there are gaps in the system elsewhere in Roseburg. Bicyclists who don’t feel safe in the travel lanes often ride their bikes on sidewalks, creating a hazard for pedestrians and wheelchair users. This project will create new bike lanes on Stephens, Spruce, Douglas and other streets.
  • Wider bike lanes

    Wider bike lanes

    On the Washington Avenue Bridge, the existing bike lane is so narrow that bicyclists often ride on the sidewalk, forcing pedestrians to move into the road. This project will widen the bike lane on the bridge.
  • New path

    New path

    With new bike lanes and sidewalks on Spruce and Douglas, we want to make it easier for people to reach the riverfront area. This project will create a new sidewalk spur that connects the riverfront path with the intersection of Spruce and Washington.
  • Cracked sidewalks

    Cracked sidewalks

    Most of the sidewalks in downtown Roseburg date back several decades. Some are cracking and in poor condition, making it difficult for pedestrians and the disabled to use. This project will replace old and damaged sidewalks.
  • Rail crossing

    Rail crossing

    Throughout the project area, pedestrian facilities will be upgraded to make it easier for everyone, including those in wheelchairs, to get around.
  • Improved crossing

    Improved crossing

    Improvements to the railroad crossings on Douglas, Washington and Oak will include new sidewalks, similar to those at the railroad crossing on Garden Valley Boulevard.
  • Safer crosswalk

    Safer crosswalk

    The crosswalk along Stephens at Diamond Lake Boulevard is one of the longest in Oregon. It can be a challenge for some people to safely cross. This project will install two pedestrian refuges to make it easier for elderly and disabled pedestrians to cross.
  • Landscaped areas

    Landscaped areas

    To make room for the new left-turn lane from northbound Stephens onto Douglas, the retaining wall along the side of the old Safeway property will be moved back. As part of this project, the area will also be landscaped to make it more attractive.

Bicycle and pedestrian features map (pdf, 1.2mb).

The OR 138E Corridor Solutions project offers several features that will make it easier for pedestrians and bicycle riders to travel safely through the downtown area.

  • Multiuse path: There are currently several bicycle and pedestrian paths in the Roseburg area. This project will create a 10-foot wide multiuse path that connects the Fairgrounds path with downtown Roseburg. The new segment begins on Harvard Avenue near the northbound Interstate 5 off-ramp, continues west across the Oak Avenue Bridge and extends to Spruce Street. From there, bicyclists can continue east on Oak or turn left on Spruce, which will take them toward Highway 138 or along the south Umpqua River to Gaddis Park. A short connector path will be built near the intersection of Washington and Spruce, linking the Spruce bike lanes with the Riverside Park multiuse path.
  • Oak Avenue Bridge: As part of the new multiuse path, the existing walkway on Oak Avenue Bridge will be widened to 10 feet and will include two riverview overlooks. New pedestrian bridge rail will be installed and the streetlights on the bridge will be replaced. Decorative monuments will be installed at the west end of the Oak and Washington Avenue bridges.
  • Washington Avenue Bridge: The westbound bike lanes on the Washington Avenue Bridge will be widened to better accommodate bicycles. The streetlights on the bridge will also be replaced.
  • New bike lanes: This project will create new bicycle lanes on Spruce Street, Douglas Avenue and Stephens Street.
  • Railroad crossings: The railroad crossings on Douglas, Washington and Oak Avenue will be upgraded, providing a smooth riding surface for bicycles and motor vehicles. New sidewalks will be installed around the crossings, which will benefit pedestrians and wheelchair users.
  • Streetlights: To improve safety, new lighting will be provided throughout the project area, including the waterfront walking path between the Oak and Washington Avenue Bridges.
  • Sidewalks: Old and damaged sidewalks and ADA ramps will be replaced throughout the project area, and new sidewalks will be built on Spruce and Douglas.
  • Crosswalks: The Stephens Street crosswalk at Diamond Lake Boulevard is one of the longest in Oregon, which can make it difficult to safely navigate for elderly pedestrians and wheelchair users. This project will separate the crosswalk into three segments, and will include two pedestrian refuges.
  • Signs: In addition to new directional and traffic signs on Stephens, Oak and Washington, this project will add wayfinding signs for bicyclists and pedestrians in several locations.
  • Bus pullout: A bus pullout will be constructed at the west end of the Washington Avenue Bridge, making it safer for bus users to wait and get on and off the buses without impeding the flow of traffic.

Where do you want to go?

Project Overview - Project highlights.

Problems and Solutions - Why is ODOT doing this project?

Construction and Traffic Impacts - How road work will affect you.

Crash Reduction Features - How this project will help improve safety.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features - Getting around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.

Enhancement Features - Improving the downtown experience for everyone.

Stay Informed - Get the latest project information and updates.

Enhancement Features

Discover how ODOT and the City of Roseburg are working together to make downtown Roseburg a more attractive place to visit.

Video: Enhancement features; 1 min 39 sec

The main goal of the OR 138E Corridor Solutions project is to improve safety and the flow of traffic through downtown Roseburg. But at the request of the City of Roseburg, ODOT is also including several features aimed at making the downtown area a more enjoyable place to visit and a more profitable place to do business.

Over the past several years, the City of Roseburg and ODOT have built multiuse paths in several areas of Roseburg with the goal of eventually connecting them into a broader bicycle and pedestrian network. As part of the OR 138E Corridor Solutions project, a multiuse path will be built along Harvard and Oak Avenue, connecting the Fairgrounds path with the downtown area and the paved path that leads to Gaddis Park. When the new multiuse path is complete, people in Green will be able to walk, run or ride their bikes to downtown Roseburg and destinations beyond.

Besides the health benefits of having a bike-ped network in place, there are economic benefits as well. Each year, more people plan bicycle vacations. Cycle Oregon attracts hundreds of riders on their annual tours of the state. Having a growing and well-maintained bike-ped network in Roseburg opens up more tourism opportunities, which is why the City of Roseburg and many local businesses support these efforts.

While the multiuse path leads visitors to the heart of Roseburg, the renovated Oak Avenue Bridge will function as the city’s new welcome mat. The walking path on the bridge will be widened to 10 feet and will feature decorative rail and traditional lampposts that are designed to complement the city’s new streetscape improvements. Two riverview outlooks will be built on the bridge, allowing visitors to pause and enjoy the natural scenery. At the west end of the bridge, two monuments built by Oregon artists will welcome visitors to the land of Umpqua.

The City of Roseburg has also requested road and traffic improvements that will benefit the downtown community. A new bus pullout will be constructed at the west end of the Washington Avenue Bridge, allowing both lanes coming off the bridge to keep moving when the bus pulls over. And on Stephens Street, new turn lanes at Douglas Avenue will give motorists another option to reach the county courthouse and downtown businesses.

Many of these enhance features also have an important safety component. The new multiuse path will help keep bicycles and motor vehicles separated, improving safety for both. New pedestrian lighting will be installed throughout the project area and along the Riverside Park footpath. Although the lampposts will be decorative, the illumination they provide will serve an important safety function. And while the bus pullout on Washington Avenue will keep traffic moving off the bridge, it will also lower the risk of rear-end crashes.

The last major addition to the downtown transportation system was the construction of the Oak Avenue Bridge in 1970. The OR 138 Corridor Solutions project, along with the city’s Oak and Washington Avenue improvements, will give everyone an opportunity to rediscover downtown Roseburg.

Where do you want to go?

Project Overview - Project highlights.

Problems and Solutions - Why is ODOT doing this project?

Construction and Traffic Impacts - How road work will affect you.

Crash Reduction Features - How this project will help improve safety.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features - Getting around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.

Enhancement Features - Improving the downtown experience for everyone.

Stay Informed - Get the latest project information and updates.

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Stay Informed

The best way to avoid traffic delays is to stay informed and plan ahead. We want to make it easy for you to get the latest project updates.

Video: Stay Informed; 51 sec
Get the whole picture at roseburg138.com.

The best way to avoid traffic delays is to find out what’s going on and plan ahead. We understand there are a lot of ways people get information and stay connected. Here are a few options for getting the latest project news, construction updates and traffic information.

  • Email updates: ODOT will provide project updates once or twice a month during construction, unless more frequent messages are necessary. These messages will include information about the progress of construction and upcoming traffic impacts. To receive these updates, please visit our Subscriber Preferences page.
  • Project website: Find out more about this project at www.roseburg138.com.
  • TripCheck: Learn about road conditions in Roseburg and throughout Oregon by visiting www.tripcheck.com or dialing 511.
  • Social media: You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook @OregonDOT. Note: these are statewide services and will include information about construction and road conditions throughout Oregon.
  • Local media: We will be sending news releases and weekly updates to the Roseburg media. Just pick up a paper, go to your favorite news website, or turn on the TV or radio.
  • Smartphone apps: Although ODOT doesn’t endorse any product, several apps provide real-time traffic information. Two of the more popular are Inrix and Waze. Check the reviews online to see if these apps are for you. And when you’re driving, please keep your eyes on the road.
  • Give us a call: Sometimes the easiest way to get an answer is to pick up the phone. For more information, please call 541-957-3601 or 541-957-3500.

We’d like to hear from you…

If you have a comment, question or suggestion, please contact:

Dan Latham
ODOT Public Affairs
3500 NW Stewart Parkway
Roseburg, OR 97470

Email: Dan.Latham@odot.state.or.us
Phone: 541-957-3601

Where do you want to go?

Project Overview - Project highlights.

Problems and Solutions - Why is ODOT doing this project?

Construction and Traffic Impacts - How road work will affect you.

Crash Reduction Features - How this project will help improve safety.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Features - Getting around by foot, bicycle or wheelchair.

Enhancement Features - Improving the downtown experience for everyone.

Stay Informed - Get the latest project information and updates.

100% Complete

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About this site

This web site was developed by JLA Public Involvement and is not hosted by the Oregon Department of Transportation, though we adhere to the same accessibility guidelines. If you have any problems with the information on this page, please contact technical support, (503) 235-5881 for assistance.