This site may be easier to use if viewed in the "landscape" orientation.
 

Multnomah County Roads Capital Improvement Plan

This open house is now closed — but you can learn more and give feedback through the project website.

Overview video: 54 sec

Stations

Go directly to a station using the buttons below, or at the top of the screen to move through the stations in order.

1

Background

Learn about the Roads CIP and what it will do. 
2

What We've Heard

We asked for feedback about how you perceive problems and priorities. Here is what you said. 
3

Evaluation Criteria and Scenarios

The Evaluation Criteria will help the County decide which projects to build. Give us feedback about what is important to you. 
4

Project Map and List

Review and provide feedback on projects that could be included in the Plan. 
5

Next Steps

Learn about what will happen next and how you can be involved. Sign up for the project mailing list. 

= Page includes questions or opportunities for comment.

Background

The Roads Capital Improvement Plan (RCIP) will guide Multnomah County as it decides which roads to improve over the next 20 years.

Video: 3 min 16 sec

What is the Roads Capital Improvement Plan (RCIP)?

Every few years, Multnomah County updates a plan of roads to improve over the next 20 years. This plan:

  • Helps the County know how much money (capital) is needed for roads and how to get the most from it.

  • Lays out which road improvements to make, and in what order.

Why update it now?

For the first time in more than a decade, the County is digging in deep to understand its roads. That’s crucial because:

  • Many more people live here now than 10 or 20 years ago, and more get around without a car.

  • Landslides and floods from extreme weather affect County roads more often, especially in rural areas.

  • With better tools than ever for collecting data, we can make a truly in-depth plan.

What information goes into the plan?

Along with your input last year, the County is gathering two types of information to help shape the plan:

What's on or near a road

Photo: roadway activities

  • Lanes (how many and how wide)
  • Shoulder type and width
  • Pavement condition
  • Posted speed limits
  • Inventory (traffic signals and signs; crosswalks; sidewalks and ramps; driveways; bus stops; striping; storm pipes and culverts; guardrails; bike facilities; on-street parking)

What happens on or near a road

Photo: roadside activities

  • Average daily traffic
  • Collisions and crashes
  • Landslide risk
  • Lifeline routes
  • Description of who lives and works nearby
  • Function (such as arterial, collector or local road)

More Information

What We've Heard

We asked for feedback about how you perceive problems and priorities. Here is what you said:

Problem Spots

Last year we asked, "Do you have any problem spots on County roads?"

In response, you mentioned 56 roads. Seven were mentioned at least 10 times. They are ranked below by number of mentions.

SegmentRoadMentionsIssues in a nutshell
West

Skyline Blvd.

38

Too narrow for motor and non-motor users to safely mix. Speeds too high. Poor sight lines at intersections.
West

Scholls Ferry Road

30

Confusing speed limits near county border, actual speeds too high. Lack of facilities for non-motor users. Water runs across road, with ice in winter.
West

Germantown Road

20

High-volume commute route despite being narrow and winding — a poor fit for both non-motor users and large trucks.
West

Cornelius Pass Road

19

Intersection with Skyline is confusing and dangerous, with poor sight lines.
West

Cornell Road

18

Too narrow and potholed for motor and non-motor users to safely mix.
Rural
East

Historic Columbia River Hwy.

11

Dangerous intersection with Hurlburt, pros and cons of converting to one-way to mitigate effects of tourist traffic, including by bike.
East

Marine Drive

11

Needs sidewalks and bike lanes, as well as better intersection controls at 223rd, 185th, Interlachen due to increased freight movement.

Priorities

Last year we asked, “What’s most important to consider in planning and building County roads?”

Most priorities received greater than 60 percent support in terms of combined Most Important/Important measures (shaded blue below). “Prevent collisions” received nearly unanimous support, with “Make it safer to walk and bike” a close runner-up.

Priorities bar chart


More Information

For more information about the public feedback we received, please see the Outreach Summary.

Evaluation Criteria and Scenarios

At last year’s open house, we asked whether you agreed with the evaluation criteria the project team would use to evaluate how well projects meet community needs and values. By and large, you did. Affirmation for “Safety” was nearly unanimous — and even the topic with the most limited support, “Equity,” had better than 70 percent. Our final evaluation criteria include Sustainability, Safety, Resiliency, Asset Management, Equity, and Mobility.

The final scoring of projects can vary depending on how much weight, or importance, we give each of the criteria. For example, since Safety was important to most people, should we weight it more than other criteria?

Here are four weighting scenarios to consider. Larger "donut" pieces indicate heavier weighting.

Scenarios

Scenario 1

Scenario 1 weighting
Click to enlarge.

This scenario represents a balanced weighting between the six criteria.

Below is how 10 sample projects would be prioritized if the criteria were weighted by Scenario 1:

  1. NW Cornelius Pass Rd (Highway 30 to NW Skyline Blvd)
  2. NE Halsey St (NE 202nd Ave to NE 223rd Ave)
  3. Larch Mountain Rd (Historic CR Hwy to end of road)
  4. NE Marine Dr (NW Frontage Rd to NE Sundial Rd)
  5. Johnson Creek culverts of regional concern
  6. SW Scholls Ferry Rd (SW Humphrey Blvd to county line)
  7. Cochran Rd and Troutdale Rd (intersection improvements)
  8. Stark Street Bridge
  9. Sauvie Island Loop Roads (shoulder improvements)
  10. Newberry Rd

Scenario 2

Scenario 2 weighting
Click to enlarge.

This scenario heavily weights Asset Management: choosing projects based on the condition of what exists there now, including pavement, signals and more.

Below is how 10 sample projects would be prioritized if the criteria were weighted by Scenario 2:

  1. NW Cornelius Pass Rd (Highway 30 to NW Skyline Blvd)
  2. Cochran Rd and Troutdale Rd (intersection improvements)
  3. Larch Mountain Rd (Historic CR Hwy to end of road)
  4. NE Marine Dr (NW Frontage Rd to NE Sundial Rd)
  5. Johnson Creek culverts of regional concern
  6. SW Scholls Ferry Rd (SW Humphrey Blvd to count line)
  7. NE Halsey St (NE 202nd Ave to NE 223rd Ave)
  8. Stark Street Bridge
  9. Sauvie Island Loop Roads (shoulder improvements)
  10. Newberry Rd

Scenario 3

Scenario 3 weighting
Click to enlarge.

This scenario heavily weights Equity: choosing projects based on serving County residents of all backgrounds and characteristics.

Below is how 10 sample projects would be prioritized if the criteria were weighted by Scenario 3:

  1. NE Halsey St (NE 202nd Ave to NE 223rd Ave)
  2. Cochran Rd and Troutdale Rd (intersection improvements)
  3. Stark Street Bridge
  4. NW Cornelius Pass Rd (Highway 30 to NW Skyline Blvd)
  5. Larch Mountain Rd (Historic CR Hwy to end of road)
  6. NE Marine Dr (NW Frontage Rd to NE Sundial Rd)
  7. SW Scholls Ferry Rd (SW Humphrey Blvd to county line)
  8. Johnson Creek culverts of regional concern
  9. Sauvie Island Loop Roads (shoulder improvements)
  10. Newberry Rd

Scenario 4

Scenario 4 weighting
Click to enlarge.

This scenario heavily weights Safety: choosing projects based on data such as crash frequency, and on potential safety benefits.

Below is how 10 sample projects would be prioritized if the criteria were weighted by Scenario 4:

  1. Larch Mountain Rd (Historic CR Hwy to end of road)
  2. NE Halsey St (NE 202nd Ave to NE 223rd Ave)
  3. NW Cornelius Pass Rd (Highway 30 to Skyline Blvd)
  4. NE Marine Dr (NW Frontage Rd to NE Sundial Rd)
  5. Johnson Creek culverts of regional concern
  6. SW Scholls Ferry Rd (SW Humphrey Blvd to county line)
  7. Cochran Rd and Troutdale Rd (intersection improvements)
  8. Stark Street Bridge
  9. Sauvie Island Loop Roads (shoulder improvements)
  10. Newberry Rd

Questions

Please rank the weighting scenarios below: 1 (most important or most preferable) through 4 (least important or least preferable).

Click and drag the options listed below into this box, then arrange by priority.
  • Scenario 1 (Balance) Not ranked.
  • Scenario 2 (Asset Management Focus) Not ranked.
  • Scenario 3 (Equity Focus) Not ranked.
  • Scenario 4 (Safety Focus) Not ranked.

Project Map and List

The plan is about improving roads with added features such as guardrails or wider shoulders. Maintaining roads, such as filling potholes, has a separate plan and separate funding.

Review the list of projects below, then give us feedback. Tell us your top five, and what you would add or change in their descriptions.

Click the tabs below to browse the list of potential projects as a map or searchable list, then answer the questions.


Project Map

Click and drag to explore the map, click lines, shapes, and icons to read about individual projects. Turn layers on and off and browse the list of projects by clicking the Google Maps Layers button in the upper left of the map window. You may need to turn off layers with large map objects to select other objects beneath.

(The projects shown on this map are the same as shown in the project list.)

Project List

Narrow the list of projects by keyword search; click the table headers to sort by column.

(The projects listed in this table are the same as shown on the project map.)

Questions

After exploring the proposed projects listed on the previous tabs, answer the questions below.

Your Top Five Projects

The previous tabs list projects that the County could prioritize. After you look at them, choose five using the dropdown menus below that have the highest priority for you.

1. (Select one.)
2. (Select one.)
3. (Select one.)
4. (Select one.)
5. (Select one.)
83% Complete

Next Steps

Thank you for participating. Your feedback about projects and how they are evaluated will shape the updated RCIP.

What else influences how we decide what projects to build?

The prioritized list of projects is a reflection of the order in which we would deliver projects if we had limitless resources and no emergencies or other mitigating factors when selection criteria is applied. However, we have to be responsive to issues and funding opportunities when they arise. Mitigating factors that can influence when and why we build a project:

  • Natural Disasters - Some capital projects may be prioritized in response to landslides and wildfires to ensure safety through timely repairs.
  • Grant Availability - Prioritization may be given when grant opportunities arise.
  • Development - Sometimes the conditions of a development project require the County to make improvements, such as ensuring curbs are ADA compliant.
  • Partnering - Other jurisdictions often do work that involves our roads. The County aims to leverage these partnerships where items such as cost and time savings can occur.
  • Community Feedback - Community concerns and safety issues are received and tracked to inform and evaluate project priorities in order to address these concerns. Report hazardous road conditions.

Stay Involved

ScheduleProject Schedule


Tell us about you

On average, how often do you use rural County roads such as those on Sauvie Island or in the Columbia Gorge?

(Check one.)

On average, how often do you use urban County roads such as those in Troutdale, Fairview and Wood Village?

(Check one.)

How do you usually get around?

(Check one.)

How would you describe yourself

(Check all that apply.)

How did you hear about this online workshop?

(Check all that apply.)

What are the best ways to communicate with you?

(Check all that apply.)

Contact Information

Optional: Join the list for email updates.

Demographic Questions (Optional)

Your answers to these questions help us know if we are reaching a representative sample of stakeholders. They are completely optional.

How do you describe your race/ethnicity?

(Check all that apply.)

What language do you speak at home most often?

(Check all that apply.)

What is your gender?

(Check one.)

Do you rent or own your home?

(Check one.)

What is your annual household income?

(Check one.)
100% Complete