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Welcome!

The City of Corvallis is updating its Transportation System Plan (TSP) and has completed an analysis of the City's current and future transportation needs. At this online open house, you can review the project findings and provide your ideas for potential transportation solutions.

The survey portion of this site is no longer active, though you can always submit comments through the project website.

Project Information

Open House Stations

1

Project Overview

Learn about the purpose of a TSP, the project background, and review the project Goals and Objectives. 
2

Auto and Freight Conditions

Learn more about the auto and freight needs and share your ideas for solutions. 
3

Bicycling Conditions

Learn more about biking needs and share your ideas for solutions. 
4

Pedestrian Conditions

Learn more about pedestrian needs and share your ideas for solutions. 
5

Transit Conditions

Learn more about transit needs and share your ideas for solutions. 
6

Next Steps / Stay Informed

Tell us more about you, and learn how you can be involved in the next steps of the process. 

= Page includes questions or opportunities for comment.

Project Overview

The way we travel to school, work and activities is an essential part of each day — whether it’s on foot, in a car, on a bike or skateboard, or riding on a bus. Having people get where they need to go safely and efficiently is a top priority for the City of Corvallis. This process is underway to plan for our community’s transportation needs as the area grows.

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Project Update

The project has achieved many milestones since kick-off. A project Steering Committee was formed to provide a community perspective to the process of developing the Transportation System Plan update and Transit Development Plan. Their meetings are open to the public. Last year, a city-wide survey gathered information from people living and working in Corvallis about the TSP goals. The team used that input to refine the draft goals and objectives. The project goals include:

  • Providing an efficient transportation system that supports economic vitality by facilitating the local and regional movement of people and goods.
  • Providing a transportation system that enhances the health and safety of residents.
  • Providing a diversified and accessible transportation system that ensures mobility for all members of the community and provides viable alternatives to automobile travel.
  • Providing a sustainable transportation system through responsible stewardship of financial and environmental resources.

Most recently, a series of memos were prepared identifying transportation challenges and opportunities in Corvallis. You can review summaries of these findings on the following pages.

A draft TSP document is expected to be complete by fall 2017 with an adopted final draft by summer 2018.

Provide Your Input

On the following pages you can learn about the current and future needs for driving, biking, walking and taking transit in Corvallis, then provide your ideas for solutions that address these needs. This is an important time for you to weigh in on the project. Your input will be used to inform the project team as they develop solutions to meet our transportation and transit needs over the next 20 years.

Auto and Freight Conditions

The project team analyzed the current and future needs for drivers. As the city grows, more people will be traveling on our roads, the number of congested intersections that fail to meet mobility standards will double, and congestion on the Van Buren Bridge and Philomath Boulevard will increase significantly.

Learn more about auto and freight needs below, and share your ideas for solutions.

Existing Driving Conditions and Key Issues (2014)

  • Nearly two thirds of the workers in Corvallis live in another city, encouraging travel by motor vehicle.
  • Motor vehicle volumes on the roadways in Corvallis most commonly peak during weekday evenings between 4:45 p.m. and 5:45 p.m.
  • Within Corvallis, most truck traffic is concentrated on the state highways (US 20, OR 34, and OR 99W), which are classified as state and federal freight/truck routes.
  • The one-lane Van Buren Bridge is a key congestion bottleneck that cannot accommodate large trucks and emergency service vehicles due to a weight restriction and substandard vertical clearance.
  • Corvallis experiences around 530 crashes a year, though the severity of most crashes is generally low, with 83 percent involving only property damage or minor injuries. Crashes involving pedestrians and people on bikes generally result in higher severity injuries.
  • Most crashes result from mistakes, so solutions involving education and enforcement may be most effective.
  • A common complaint is that traffic diverts through neighborhood streets to avoid congested corridors.

Future Driving Conditions and Key Issues (year 2040)

  • Vehicle-miles Traveled (VMT) per capita is projected to increase by 19% if no further investments in the transportation system are made.
  • Congestion on the Van Buren Bridge and OR 34 to the east will increase significantly, likely leading to diversion of traffic to US 20 and OR 99W (north).
  • Over-capacity conditions on US 20-OR 34 between Philomath and Corvallis has the potential to increase traffic on city streets, with re-routing onto parallel roadways such as SW West Hills Road and SW Western Boulevard.
  • By 2040, the number of congested intersections failing to meet mobility standards is expected to double. The most congested areas will likely be along state highway corridors.
  • The travel times for most freight/truck routes are expected to increase by up to 30 percent except eastbound OR 34 where travel times are expected to double, both from downtown (via Van Buren Avenue) and via the OR 34 Bypass.

Use the map below to provide comments

To place a comment, click the " + Comment" button which will reveal a crosshairs on the map. Click and drag the map with your mouse to center the cross-hairs on a location, or use the search box to find a specific address. You can use the zoom buttons (+/-) to view more or less map detail. Click "Place Comment" to place a marker on the map. To read and respond to other comments, click the icons on the map. Click "Reset" to re-center the map.

Map Legend

High crash locationHigh Crash LocationCongested corridorCongested Corridor
Freight IssueFreight IssueHigh collision densityHigher Collision Density
Public commentPublic Comment
Additional InformationAdditional InformationLower collision densityLower Collision Density

Comments

Bicycling Conditions

The project team analyzed current and future needs for biking in Corvallis. Bike lanes are present on most major streets in Corvallis. However, safety at intersections, conflicts with vehicle right turns and crossing wide streets with heavy traffic volumes are key concerns for bicyclists now and will intensify as the city grows.

Learn more about biking needs below, and share your ideas for solutions.

Qualities of Good Bicycle Facilities

  • Presence of bike lanes
  • Fewer travel lanes
  • Low speed limits

Existing Bicycle Conditions

  • 12% of Corvallis residents bike to work (2nd highest bike mode share in country) 2
  • More than 80% of Corvallis arterials and collectors have bike lanes
  • Half of ODOT roads have bike lanes
  • High bicycle stress on larger roadways

Bicycle Concerns

  • Safety at intersections and vehicle right turns
  • Crossing wide streets with heavy traffic volumes present barriers along low stress bike streets, such as: Tyler Avenue at 9th Street; Jackson Ave at 3rd/4th Streets; Adams Ave at 4th Street
  • Vehicle speeds and traffic density are a concern
  • Bike lanes need better maintenance and design
  • Heavy conflicts between modes of travel surrounding OSU

2 For communities of 50,000 or more. US Census ACS 2010-2015 5-Year Estimates

Use the map below to provide comments

To place a comment, click the " + Comment" button which will reveal a crosshairs on the map. Click and drag the map with your mouse to center the cross-hairs on a location, or use the search box to find a specific address. You can use the zoom buttons (+/-) to view more or less map detail. Click "Place Comment" to place a marker on the map. To read and respond to other comments, click the icons on the map. Click "Reset" to re-center the map.

Map Legend

High bicycle stressIntersection With Extreme Bicycle StressHigh collision densityHigher Collision Density
Congested corridorDeficient Roadway Segment*
Public commentPublic CommentLower collision densityLower Collision Density

*Deficient segments were identified if they met one or more of the following criteria: High or extreme bicycle stress near important destinations; Extreme stress in urbanized areas; Moderate, high or extreme stress near transit with 30 or more trips per day; High or extreme stress near transit stops; Moderate, high or extreme stress along a Safe Routes to School network; Substandard ODOT facility.


Comments

Pedestrian Conditions

The project team analyzed current and future needs for walking in Corvallis. The quality of pedestrian facilities in Corvallis is high overall, but generally lower on larger facilities and busier streets. Many people have noted that streets downtown and in commercial areas don’t feel pedestrian friendly.

Learn more about pedestrian needs below, and share your ideas for solutions.

Qualities of Good Pedestrian Facilities

  • Low traffic volumes
  • Low speed limits
  • Fewer travel lanes
  • On-street parking or landscaped buffer between roadway and sidewalk

Existing Pedestrian Conditions

  • 12% of Corvallis residents walk to work (17th highest walk mode share in the country)1
  • 78% of roads owned by the City of Corvallis and 36% of roads owned by ODOT have sidewalks on both sides (71% overall)
  • High pedestrian quality exists on most roads in Corvallis; however larger and busier streets tend to have lower quality

Pedestrian Concerns

  • Downtown and commercial areas do not feel pedestrian friendly
  • Heavy conflicts between modes of travel on Monroe, Harrison, and other streets around OSU
  • Vegetation encroaching into sidewalks/multi-use paths
  • Gaps in sidewalk system
  • Establishing Safe Routes to Schools
  • Sidewalks on some of the city’s bridges are too narrow

1 For communities of 50,000 or more. US Census ACS 2010-2014 5-Year Estimates

Use the map below to provide comments

To place a comment, click the " + Comment" button which will reveal a crosshairs on the map. Click and drag the map with your mouse to center the cross-hairs on a location, or use the search box to find a specific address. You can use the zoom buttons (+/-) to view more or less map detail. Click "Place Comment" to place a marker on the map. To read and respond to other comments, click the icons on the map. Click "Reset" to re-center the map.

Map Legend

Low pedestrian qualityIntersection With Low Pedestrian QualityHigh collision densityHigher Collision Density
Congested corridorDeficient Roadway Segment*
Public commentPublic CommentLower collision densityLower Collision Density

*Deficient segments were identified if they met one or more of the following criteria: Pedestrian quality less than high near important destinations; Low quality in urbanized areas; Pedestrian quality less than high near transit with 30 or more trips per day; Medium or lower quality near transit stops; Pedestrian quality less than high along a Safe Routes to School network; Substandard ODOT facility.


Comments

Transit Conditions

The project team analyzed current and future needs for transit. CTS has a high-level of ridership with routes designed around community characteristics. Currently on-time performance is not meeting expectations and as the city grows service will need to expand to serve new population and employment centers.

Learn more about transit needs below, and share your ideas for solutions.

Existing Transit Conditions

  • Route design aligned with community characteristics
  • 2 of the 8 all-day routes have 30‑minute frequencies
  • Ridership increased following implementation of fare free operations (February 2011) and is now stable
  • High ridership relative to level of investment in transit
  • On-time performance not meeting expectations
  • Transit dependent populations are concentrated in SE Corvallis and areas of North Corvallis
  • Kings Blvd., 9th St. and SE Corvallis are highest boarding areas

Potential Future Transit Service Needs

  • Expected population growth in SE and western Corvallis
  • Expected employment growth in NE and SW Corvallis

Outreach - Community Feedback on Barriers to Using Transit

  • On-time performance issues
  • Lack of weekend service
  • Indirect routes – out-of-direction travel
  • Does not go where potential rider wants
  • Trip planning difficulties
  • No stop near home

Outreach - Rider Feedback on Desired Improvements

  • Better on-time performance
  • Sunday service
  • More frequent service
  • Later service at night
  • More Saturday service
  • Service earlier in the morning
  • Easier transfers

Use the map below to provide comments

To place a comment, click the " + Comment" button which will reveal a crosshairs on the map. Click and drag the map with your mouse to center the cross-hairs on a location, or use the search box to find a specific address. You can use the zoom buttons (+/-) to view more or less map detail. Click "Place Comment" to place a marker on the map. To read and respond to other comments, click the icons on the map. Click "Reset" to re-center the map.

Map Legend

Congested corridorRoadway With Forecasted Congestion
Public commentPublic Comment

Comments

Next Steps / Stay Informed

Thank you for participating in this online event and for your interest in the project. The project team will consider the solution ideas collected from the public as they work on developing draft solutions. The public can review the draft solutions and provide feedback during the spring 2017. The team will evaluate and refine solutions based on your input.

Comment

  • Submit your comments using the form below.
  • Visit www.CorvallisTSP.org to provide comments anytime.
  • Email: info@CorvallisTSP.org.
  • Contact the Project Manager: Adam Steele, Corvallis Public Works Project Manager at (541) 766-6916 or adam.steele@corvallisoregon.gov

Stay Informed

  • Sign up for the mailing list below.
  • Attend our next Open House in the spring.
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Tell us about yourself

Mailing list

Provide your contact information if you would like to be added to the project mailing list. (Optional.)

Demographic Questions (Optional)

We are requesting the following demographic information to help evaluate the effectiveness of our public outreach activities. Your identity will be kept confidential and the results will be reported as totals. Providing this information is voluntary and optional.
Your Race/Ethnicity (Check all that apply.)
Languages spoken at home other than English (Check all that apply.)
What is your age? (Check one.)
What was your total household income last year before taxes? (Check one.)
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Before you leave, be sure to submit any comments you've provided. (The option to review and submit answers will appear after you answer at least one question.)

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