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Welcome to the Beaverton Active Transportation Plan's second virtual open house!

During the first virtual open house we asked for feedback on your experiences biking, walking, and rolling around Beaverton. Now we are providing a project status update, a summary of the public input we've received, and an opportunity for you to provide feedback on the types of bike and pedestrian facilities being proposed in the Beaverton Active Transportation Plan.

We want to hear what you think about these recommendations.

Comments are no longer being accepted through this site, though you can submit feedback through the project webpage.

Stations

In this open house there are a series of stations where you can learn about the project and provide input. Go directly to a station using the buttons below, or at the top of the screen to move through the stations in order.

1

Overview

Overview of the project, process, and timeline 
2

What we've learned

What we heard at the first open house from bicyclists and pedestrians. 
3

Proposed pedestrian network

Give feedback on the proposed future pedestrian network. 
4

Proposed bicycle network

Learn about proposed functional classifications. 
5

Bicycle facilities

Give feedback on the proposed bicycle facilities. 
6

Next steps

Learn about next steps, answer a few more questions, and sign up for project updates. 

= Page includes questions or opportunities for comment.

Overview

The Beaverton Active Transportation Plan (ATP) is a long-range plan that will make the City of Beaverton a better place for walking and biking independent for people of all skill levels and ages. The goal of the ATP is to identify missing or deficient links in the City of Beaverton’s existing Active Transportation network, and propose recommendations to enhance the safety and encourage the use of bicycling and walking as modes of transportation.

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  • Essential destinations

    Essential destinations

    This map is designed to show where there are key destinations that serve daily needs of City of Beaverton residents. The City of Beaverton envisions having a transportation system that allows its residents to comfortably walk and bike to these types of destinations. The map shows where there are higher concentrations of essential destinations (density) along with specific locations of some of the more prominent destinations within the City.
  • Employment density and transit service

    Employment density and transit service

    This map shows employment density in all industries across the City of Beaverton – a calculation that looks at the number of jobs at all locations of employment in the City and surrounding areas. Areas of higher employment density have more people working there. This map also shows existing transit service, with the goal of being able to identify locations where investments in sidewalks or bicycle facilities could serve a high number of employees between transit and their job location.
  • Reported Pedestrian and Bicycle Crashes 2011-2015

    Reported Pedestrian and Bicycle Crashes 2011-2015

    This map shows the location and severity of reported crashes that involved someone either walking or biking during the five-year period between 2011 and 2015. The crashes shown include only those that are reported, that also involve a vehicle, and that involve either an injury or at least $1,500 of property damage. Because of these criteria, it is likely that the actual number of crashes involving bicyclists and pedestrians is under-reported. Currently, however, there is not a more comprehensive data source available.

The main objectives of the ATP are to:

  • Enhance safe opportunities for walking, biking, and taking transit to the destinations they need to reach: schools, employment, transit, and other community destinations.
  • Ensure that all neighborhoods in Beaverton have options for walking, biking, and transit.
  • Reduce climate-changing emissions.
  • Create a network of low-stress neighborhood routes to serve all ages and abilities of bicyclists and pedestrians.
  • Improve safety for all modes.
  • Set up Beaverton transportation projects to be competitive for grants and regional funding opportunities.

In the following stations, we'll describe some of the feedback we've heard so far and give you the opportunity to provide feedback on the types of bike and pedestrian facilities being proposed in the ATP.


Project Information Sheet (PDF, 1.2 MB)

What we've learned

During the first virtual open house in February, we asked for feedback on your experiences biking, walking, and rolling around Beaverton. We received over 539 visitors and 134 comments relating to the types of bicycle and pedestrian facilities you want to see.

What we learned from bicyclists

"What type of bicyclist are you?"

At the first virtual open house, participants were asked to define what type of bicyclist they are based on the “Four Types of Bicyclists” – Strong and Fearless, Enthused and Confident, Interested but Concerned, No Way No How.

A total of 50 participants identified as "Interested, but Concerned"bicyclists. This group in particular was reviewed, since they represent the "target rider" for bicycle facility design in Beaverton. The graph below illustrates this group’s responses to the survey questions that followed, regarding their comfort level on the various bicycle facilities in Beaverton.

"Would you be comfortable bicycling here?" (Interested but Concerned Respondents only)

Chart of responses from Interested but Concerned respondents.

The feedback provided to us by those who identified as "Interested but Concerned" bicyclists conveys a clear desire to provide protected bicycle facilities in the form of multi-use trails and protected bicycle lanes. Providing bicycle infrastructure that accommodates this group of "Interested but Concerned" bicyclists has the greatest potential of increasing bicycling in Beaverton.

What we learned from pedestrians

In the first virtual open house, participants were also asked how they felt about different pedestrian facilities in Beaverton. We received feedback about treatments that make people feel comfortable and what makes them uncomfortable. Most comments received were related to needs for improved crossings at existing locations by providing safety enhancements in the form of paint, American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant facilities, and traffic calming features. Comments were also received relevant to improving routes by providing sidewalk facilities in missing network gaps and enhancing existing facilities.

Each comment is being considered to help the project team understand where there is a need or desire for an improvement, and will ultimately help inform the policies and projects included in the Active Transportation Plan.

Proposed pedestrian network

To help us plan and prioritize improvements for pedestrians, we are proposing the following future pedestrian network that identifies each facility’s function in the network. This is called functional classification. The definition for each pedestrian functional classification is described below. The proposed classifications ensure a compatible and connected system with Metro and Washington County plans for walking.

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Proposed pedestrian functional classifications

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  • Proposed pedestrian functional classifications

    Proposed pedestrian functional classifications

Defining Functional Classifications for Pedestrians

Pedestrian Parkways

Typically proposed for major streets with transit service (arterials and collectors) or along regional trails. Provide direct regional connections over longer distances and have enhanced crossings at transit stops.

Pedestrian Corridors

Proposed on minor collectors and arterials with transit service or along regional and local trails. Provide connections between pedestrian parkways and have enhanced crossings at transit stops.

Local Streets

Local streets provide connections between residential areas and local destinations, and between pedestrian parkways and corridors. All local streets serve as designated routes for pedestrians.

Pedestrian Districts

Areas that currently have or are planned to have a mix of land use types and densities that support high level of pedestrian activity. Highly connected networks and frequent, safe and accessible enhanced crossings at arterials, collectors and other types of barriers. Washington County’s designated Pedestrian Districts in unincorporated areas are also identified to show all areas that are anticipated to be designed as pedestrian orientated areas.

Washington County Designations

Washington County Streetscape Overlay

A Washington County requirement for enhanced pedestrian treatments, as defined by the Washington County Pedestrian Enhancements Guidelines or other applicable County standards. This is shown to identify where sidewalks may be required to be wider than standard along County roadways within the City of Beaverton.

Washington County Pedestrian and Bicycle Districts

Washington County Pedestrian and Bicycle Districts are classified as Regional Centers, Town Centers and Station Communities in Metro’s 2040 Growth Concept. Pedestrian and Bicycle Districts have high pedestrian and bicyclists use observed or intended and use of enhanced street design features to help foster the envisioned land use, economic and transportation mode share targets. Washington County’s Pedestrian/Bicycle Districts are located in unincorporated areas and are shown to identify all areas anticipated to be designed as pedestrian oriented.


Questions

Does the proposed map of functional classifications meet the need for a connected pedestrian network? (Check one.)

Proposed bicycle network

The City of Beaverton is proposing the following future bicycle network that identifies each facility’s function in the network. This is called functional classification. The definition for each bicycle functional classification is described below. We are looking for your feedback on whether these functional classifications seem appropriate for specific corridors. The proposed classifications ensure a compatible and connected system with Metro and Washington County plans for biking.

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Proposed bicycle functional classification map

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  • Proposed bicycle functional classification map

    Proposed bicycle functional classification map

Defining Functional Classifications for Bicyclists

Enhanced Major Bikeways

Proposed along major arterials where vehicle volumes and speeds are high. Provide an exclusive space for bicyclists along or within a roadway that is physically separated from motor vehicles by vertical or horizontal elements.

Major Bikeways

Proposed on collectors and occasional arterials where vehicle volumes and speeds are high but less than a major arterial. Designated space for bicycle travel separated from motor vehicles with paint or temporary vertical elements such as flex-post or bollards. The separation between bicycles and motor vehicles for major bikeways largely depends on the context of the corridor.

Neighborhood Bikeways

Proposed on residential streets where vehicle volumes and speeds are low. Provide sharrows, designated to inform motorist to expect bicyclists to be in the middle of a travel lane while also serving as a wayfinding resource for bicyclists in neighborhood bikeway networks.


Questions

Does the proposed map of functional classifications meet the need for a connected bicycle network? (Check one.)

Bicycle facilities

Based on the survey results about the types of facilities that would make more people comfortable bicycling in Beaverton, we are proposing the following bicycle facility types to provide a safe and comfortable bicycling network in Beaverton.

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Proposed bicycle facilities

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  • Proposed bicycle facilities

    Proposed bicycle facilities

Bicycle facility types

Protected Bike Lanes

Typically located on major arterials with high vehicular volumes, a protected bike lane is an exclusive space for bicyclists along or within a roadway that is physically separated from motor vehicles by vertical and horizontal elements. They may be one-way or two-way facilities as shown here.

Protected bike lane exampleProtected bike lane example 2

Buffered Bike Lane

Provides physical separation in the form of vertical flexible posts or paint. Buffered bike lanes are typically suggested for collector roadways with medium to high vehicular speeds and volumes.

Buffered bike lane example 1Buffered bike lane example 2

Bike Lane

Designated exclusively for bicycle travel, bike lanes are separated from vehicle travel with striping and include pavement stencils. They may include additional enhancements such as green paint.

Bike lane example 1Bike lane example 2

Mixed Traffic or Shared Lane Marking (Sharrow)

Typically located on neighborhood streets with low vehicular volumes and speeds, “sharrows” are designated to inform motorists to expect cyclists to be in the travel lane. Shared lane markings also provide wayfinding for bicyclists on and neighborhood bike routes.

Shared bikeway example 1Shared bikeway example 2

Facility map (give feedback)

Click map elements to read about segment proposals and offer your feedback.Click "Reset" to re-center the map.


Questions

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Next steps

Over the next three months, our team will identify and prioritize projects to complete the pedestrian and bicycle networks shown in these maps. We will also do additional community outreach to gain input on the proposed networks and projects. Please sign up for our email list to receive notice of opportunities to meet with us in person at community events.

In the meantime, don't forget to use the Ride Report app as you bicycle around Beaverton. It will help us learn from your experiences and target improvements where they are needed most!

Comments are no longer being accepted through this site, though you can submit feedback through the project webpage.

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Project timeline

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  • Project timeline

    Project timeline

For More Information

Final Questions

Do you live in the City of Beaverton? (Check one.)
Do you work or go to school in the City of Beaverton? (Check one.)
How did you hear about this online open house? (Check all that apply.)

Mailing list (Optional)

Provide the following optional contact information if you would like to be added to the project mailing list.

Demographic Information (Optional)

This information can help us evaluate the effectiveness of our public outreach activities and tell us if we are reaching a representative cross-section of our community. The identity of individuals is kept confidential. The results are reported as totals only, and used solely to help improve future community engagement. Providing this information is voluntary and optional.

With which gender do you identify? (Check one.)
What is your total annual household income? (Check one.)
What languages do you speak at home? (Check all that apply.)
What is your race/ethnicity? (Check all that apply.)
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