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Welcome to the Beaverton Active Transportation Plan’s virtual open house!

In this open house, you can provide feedback about your experiences biking, walking, or rolling around Beaverton. Your feedback will help us make Beaverton a better place for these types of active transportation.

Comments are no longer being accepted through this site, though you can submit feedback through the project webpage.

Stations

In this open house there are a series of stations where you can learn about the project and provide input. Go directly to a station using the buttons below, or at the top of the screen to move through the stations in order.

1

Overview

What is the "Active Transportation Plan" anyways? 
2

Bicycling conditions

Learn about example bicycle treatments and give us your feedback on bicycling in Beaverton. Use the interactive map to report and comment on challenges within the city. 
3

Walking conditions

Learn about and give us feedback on treatments that improve conditions for walking, using wheelchairs, or other mobility devices. Use the interactive map to report and comment on challenges within the city. 
4

Prioritizing projects

Tell us: how do we decide what to do first? Where do we spend our limited funds? 
5

Next steps

Learn about next steps, answer a few more questions, and sign up for project updates. 

= Page includes questions or opportunities for comment.

Overview

The Active Transportation Plan is a long‐range plan that will make the City of Beaverton a better place for walking and biking. This first virtual open house is one further step in our efforts to identify gaps and needs in the active transportation system.

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  • Essential destinations

    Essential destinations

    This map is designed to show where there are key destinations that serve daily needs of City of Beaverton residents. The City of Beaverton envisions having a transportation system that allows its residents to comfortably walk and bike to these types of destinations. The map shows where there are higher concentrations of essential destinations (density) along with specific locations of some of the more prominent destinations within the City.
  • Employment density and transit service

    Employment density and transit service

    This map shows employment density in all industries across the City of Beaverton – a calculation that looks at the number of jobs at all locations of employment in the City and surrounding areas. Areas of higher employment density have more people working there. This map also shows existing transit service, with the goal of being able to identify locations where investments in sidewalks or bicycle facilities could serve a high number of employees between transit and their job location.
  • Reported Pedestrian and Bicycle Crashes 2011-2015

    Reported Pedestrian and Bicycle Crashes 2011-2015

    This map shows the location and severity of reported crashes that involved someone either walking or biking during the five-year period between 2011 and 2015. The crashes shown include only those that are reported, that also involve a vehicle, and that involve either an injury or at least $1,500 of property damage. Because of these criteria, it is likely that the actual number of crashes involving bicyclists and pedestrians is under-reported. Currently, however, there is not a more comprehensive data source available.

The main objectives of the Plan are to:

  • Enhance safe opportunities for walking, biking, and taking transit, in ways that connect people to the destinations they need to reach: schools, employment centers, transit, and other community destinations.
  • Ensure that all neighborhoods in Beaverton have options for walking, biking, and transit.
  • Reduce climate-changing emissions.
  • Create a network of low-stress neighborhood routes to serve all ages and abilities of bicyclists and pedestrians.
  • Improve safety for all modes.
  • Set up Beaverton transportation projects to be competitive for grants and regional funding opportunities.

Existing conditions

To better understand existing conditions and current plans, to date, our team has:

In the following stations, we'll describe the work we’ve done so far to identify needs and then get your input on the locations you would like to see improved.


Project Information Sheet (PDF, 1.2 MB)

Bicycling conditions

One goal of this plan is for all types of bicycle riders to feel comfortable riding in the city, not just those who are highly experienced and confident. To ensure we can do this, we're considering different types of bicycle facilities. At this station, we would like you to rate the different types of facilities according to how comfortable you would feel bicycling on them, and then let us know if you have other thoughts or ideas about each.

You can help us better understand how it feels to bike in Beaverton by downloading and using the Ride Report app to rate your rides. Ride Report will automatically log your rides and allow you to rate them as great or not great – and ultimately, you'll be contributing to this aggregate stress map that the project team will use to target improvements based on your experiences.

Types of bicycle facilities

Types of bicycle facilities

How can we make bicycling more comfortable?

This station shows some of the different types of treatments that are already being used within Beaverton. We would like to hear what you think about these treatments and which you would like to see used in more locations. Specify where in the City you’d like to see improvements on the "Bicycle system needs" tab.

What kind of bicyclist are you?

Which of the following describes how you think of yourself? (Check one.)

How comfortable would you feel using the following types of facilities?

Standard bike lane (2 lane road)

A Standard Bike Lane is an on-street facility that provides space designated for bicyclists, separated from vehicles by pavement markings.

Photos: Left - SW Millikan Way, Beaverton; right - SW 5th St., Beaverton

Standard bike lane (2 lane road)
How comfortable would you feel using a standard bike lane (2 land road)? (Check one.)

Standard bike lane (5 lane road)

A Standard Bike Lane is an on-street facility that provides space designated for bicyclists, separated from vehicles by pavement markings.

Photos: Left - SW Hall Blvd., Beaverton; right - SW Murray Blvd., Beaverton

Standard bike lane (5 lane road)
How comfortable would you feel using a standard bike lane (5 lane road)? (Check one.)

Buffered bike lane

A Buffered Bike Lane is an on-street lane that includes an additional striped buffer of typically 2-3 feet between the bicycle lane and the vehicle travel lane and/or between the bicycle lane and the vehicle parking lane.

Photo: Scholls Ferry Road, Beaverton

Buffered bike lane
How comfortable would you feel using a buffered bike lane? (Check one.)

Two-way protected bicycle lane (PBL)

A Two-Way Protected Bicycle Lane (PBL), also known as a cycle track or separated bike lane, is a bicycle facility within the street right-of-way separated from motor vehicle traffic by a buffer and a physical barrier, such as planters, flexible posts, parked cars, or a mountable curb. Two-way PBLs serve bi-directional bicycle travel on one side of the street.

Photo: SW 154th Terrace, Beaverton

Two-way protected bike lane
How comfortable would you feel using a two-way protected bicycle lane? (Check one.)

One-way protected bicycle lane

A One-Way Protected Bicycle Lane (PBL), also known as a cycle track or separated bike lane, is a bicycle facility within the street right-of-way separated from motor vehicle traffic by a buffer and a physical barrier, such as planters, flexible posts, parked cars, or a mountable curb. On two-way streets, a one-way PBL would be found on each side of the street, like a standard bike lane.

Photos: Left - NE Multnomah Blvd., Portland Lloyd District; Right - SW Multnomah Blvd., Portland

One-way protected bike lane
How comfortable would you feel using a one-way protected bicycle lane? (Check one.)

Sharrows

Sharrows are painted shared lane markings used in travel lanes indicating the presence of bicyclists and alerting motorists to share the lane. Sharrows can also serve as wayfinding for bicyclists, and can be used in conjunction with wayfinding signage and other traffic calming treatments.

Photos: Left - SW Broadway St., Beaverton; Right - SW Millikan Way, Beaverton

Sharrows
How comfortable would you feel using a street marked with sharrows? (Check one.)

Neighborhood route treatments

Neighborhood Route Treatments can be used on low-volume, low-speed streets where bicycles and motorized vehicles share road space, but where bicycle movements are facilitated through use of traffic calming elements, intersection crossing treatments, and wayfinding. This type of route is often called a bicycle boulevard or a neighborhood greenway.

Photo: SE 19th Avenue, Portland.

Multi-use trail
How comfortable would you feel using neighborhood routes? (Check one.)

Multi-use trails

Multi-use Trails are paved, bi-directional, trails away from roadways that serve both pedestrians and bicyclists.

Photo: Fanno Creek Trail, Beaverton.

Multi-use trail
How comfortable would you feel using multi-use trails? (Check one.)

Bicycle system needs

Bicycle system needs

To identify an initial list of bicycle related needs – gaps or deficiencies in the system – the project team has reviewed a variety of data sources and analyzed conditions for bicyclists according to the “level of traffic stress” they may experience. This helps us understand how comfortable roads or bicycle routes are for a wide range of riders. The maps below illustrate some of the work that has been done to date to identify locations of need.

What do you need from me?

Use the interactive map to let us know what you think about bicycling in Beaverton:

  1. Comment on routes or streets that you think need to be improved for biking. Let us know which are most urgent and what you’d like to see changed.
  2. Trace routes where you like to bike. In particular, we’re interested in which neighborhood streets work best for biking.
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  • Bicycle level of traffic stress

    Bicycle level of traffic stress

    Bicycle level of traffic stress (LTS) estimates the stress a bicyclist experiences riding on a particular street or trail. An LTS rating of 1 is the most comfortable (least stressful), and generally represents a street or trail that would feel comfortable for kids. LTS 2 is comfortable for most adult riders; LTS 3 is somewhat more stressful and likely appeals primarily to confident adult bicyclists. LTS 4 is the highest level of stress and is generally suited to only the “strong and fearless” adult riders. For a bicycle network to attract the broadest segment of the population, it must provide low-stress routes connecting people’s origins and destinations, without requiring them to use streets that exceed their tolerance for traffic stress. This map shows LTS on streets in and around Beaverton. The following set of maps illustrates the available network, based on a bicyclist’s comfort level.
  • Bicycle network needs

    Bicycle network needs

    This map is based on regional routes designated in the Washington County Transportation System Plan (TSP), which builds on Metro’s Regional Active Transportation Plan and shows which routes are currently lacking bicycle facilities or are currently higher-stress facilities (LTS 3 or 4) that may not serve a broad population of potential bicyclists. A “gap” on this network is a street segment that lacks bicycle facilities, while a “deficiency” is a street segment with bicycle facilities, but that still has an LTS 3 or 4 rating. Routes shown as “existing” are those that currently meet the vision for these low-stress regional routes (they are LTS 1 or 2).
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Walking conditions

For people walking, using a wheelchair, or using other mobility devices, this plan is being developed to ensure that people can safety and comfortably access transit, schools, and other destinations in Beaverton. To do this, we need a network of complete, accessible, comfortable sidewalks and trails throughout the city, in which major routes have wide sidewalks that are separated from traffic by parked cars, bicycle lanes, street trees, or other buffers so that people feel comfortable walking or rolling in a wheelchair. This network must also include appropriately spaced crossings of major streets to enable people to travel safely and directly to and from destinations


Types of pedestrian facilities

Types of pedestrian facilities

How can we make walking more comfortable?

This station shows some of the different types of treatments that are already being used within Beaverton. We would like to hear what you think about these treatments and which you would like to see used in more locations. Specify where in the City you’d like to see improvements on the "Pedestrian system needs" tab.

How do you feel about using the following types of facilities?

Wide Sidewalks

Wide Sidewalks can be used to provide more pedestrian space than might typically be provided. A sidewalk is a dedicated pedestrian facility adjacent to the roadway and separated from traffic by a curb. Wide sidewalks may provide 8 feet or more width, along with additional buffer space, street trees, furniture, or lighting.

Photos: Left - SW Broadway St., Beaverton; Right – NW 118th Ave., Beaverton.

Wide sidewalks
How do you feel about wide sidewalks? (Check one.)

Grade-Separated Crossing

A Grade-Separated Crossing is a bridge (overcrossing) or a tunnel (undercrossing) that carries non-motorized traffic over or under a motorized corridor or other barrier to travel.

Photos: Fanno Creek Trail under Scholls Ferry Road.

Grade-separated crossing
How do you feel about grade-separated crossings? (Check one.)

Midblock Pedestrian-Activated Signal

A midblock pedestrian-activated signal provides pedestrians with a signal-controlled crossing at a mid-block location or at a previously stop-controlled intersection where pedestrian volumes warrant full signalization. The signal remains green for the mainline traffic movement until actuated by a push button to call a red signal for motor vehicle traffic.

Photo: Waterhouse Trail at Walker Road, Beaverton.

 Midblock Pedestrian-Activated Signal
How do you feel about midblock pedestrian-activated signals? (Check one.)

Rectangular rapid flashing beacons

Rectangular rapid flashing beacons include signs that have a pedestrian-activated “strobe-light” flashing pattern to attract motorists’ attention and provide awareness of pedestrians and/or bicyclists that are intending to cross the roadway.

Photo: SW Millikan Rd., Beaverton. (Also features a crossing island or “pedestrian refuge” in the median.)

Rectangular rapid flashing beacons
How do you feel about rectangular rapid flashing beacons? (Check one.)

Crossing island

A Crossing Island, also known as a pedestrian refuge island or median refuge, provides a protected area in the middle of a crosswalk for pedestrians to stop while crossing the street. They can be used at intersections or mid-block crossings.

Photo: Westside Trail at SW Hart Road.

Crossing island
How do you feel about crossing islands? (Check one.)

Raised pedestrian crossing

Raised Pedestrian Crossings bring the level of the roadway even with the sidewalk, providing a level pedestrian path and requiring vehicles to slow. Raised crossings can be used at midblock crosswalks or intersections.

Photo: SW Erickson Ave., Beaverton.

Raised pedestrian crossing
How do you feel about raised pedestrian crossings? (Check one.)

High visibility crosswalks

High visibility crosswalks consist of reflective roadway markings and accompanying signage at intersections and priority pedestrian crossing locations.

Photo: SW 22nd St., Beaverton.

High visibility crosswalks
How do you feel about high visibility crosswalks? (Check one.)

Crosswalks with texture or colored pavers

A Crosswalk with Texture or Colored Pavers is marked with a different pavement texture, different material, or different color than the rest of the street. These crosswalks may or may not also include high visibility striping and can provide an aesthetically distinct option.

Photo: NW 118th Ave., Beaverton.

Crosswalks with texture or colored pavers
How do you feel about crosswalks with texture or colored pavers? (Check one.)

Pedestrian system needs

Pedestrian system needs

To identify an initial list of pedestrian related needs – gaps or deficiencies in the system – the project team has reviewed a variety of data sources and analyzed conditions for pedestrians within the City of Beaverton. The maps below illustrate some of the work that has been done to date to identify locations of needed improvements.

What do you need from me?

Use the interactive map to let us know what you think about walking in Beaverton:

  1. Trace routes or streets that you think need to be improved for walking. Let us know which are most urgent and what you’d like to see changed.
  2. Trace locations where you’d like to see street crossings improved or added.
  3. Trace routes where you like to walk. Let us know what makes them great for walking.
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  • Pedestrian crossings

    Pedestrian crossings

    This map presents locations of existing pedestrian crossings and crossing needs. Crossings at refuge islands, flashing beacons, or signalized intersections are included as existing crossings. Crossing needs were identified on arterials and collectors in areas identified as pedestrian districts, key focus areas, and locations near high priority transit stops, according to Metro’s 530-foot crossing spacing. Crossing need locations are approximate and require a field review and an engineering assessment to locate the most appropriate crossing location. 2. Key crossings identified in other city plans are also included. There some places in the City of Beaverton where the existing crossing design can be improved. These locations are not comprehensively inventoried, but potential design solutions will be included as part of the final Active Transportation Plan.
  • Pedestrian network needs

    Pedestrian network needs

    This map is based on an assessment of routes designated in Metro’s Regional Active Transportation Plan, as well as the City of Beaverton’s inventory of sidewalk coverage on local streets. The designated regional routes were reviewed to determine whether they align with Metro’s classification criteria (6’ clear space and 17’ of total pedestrian space, including buffer, for Pedestrian Parkways; 10’ total space for Pedestrian Corridors). Routes with sidewalks not meeting these criteria were then classified as either a “passable deficiency” or “impassible deficiency.” “Passable deficiencies” were estimated to have at least 4’ of clear walking space, which allows for a person in a wheelchair or mobility device to travel on sidewalk. Sidewalks classified as “impassable deficiencies” did not have 4’ of clear space and may present a barrier to travel.
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Prioritizing projects

How do we decide what to do first? Where do we spend our limited funds?

After we complete the work of identifying the pedestrian and bicycle system needs and identifying appropriate treatment options, our next step will be to prioritize the needs and match them with potential funding sources. The highest priorities will make up the near-term list of projects and actions, while other identified needs will be addressed as funding allows.

Help us determine how to best prioritize projects

Review the following descriptions of factors we will consider, and let us know which are most important to you:

  • Safety can be considered to prioritize improvements in areas where crashes have already occurred, or in areas where there is most risk of future crashes.
  • Pedestrian or bicycle demand or access can be evaluated to prioritize improvements in areas with higher numbers of people walking or biking, or with the potential for higher numbers. This factor would prioritize areas near destinations – such as schools, grocery stores, and transit centers, among others.
  • A factor related to equity would prioritize improvements in locations with higher portions of people who are either more likely to rely on walking, rolling, or bicycling, or belong to sociodemographic groups that have historically experienced under-investment.
  • System completeness looks holistically at the existing bicycle and pedestrian systems and prioritizes filling gaps, addressing barriers, and making connections that are currently not available. For example, system completeness would prioritize a gap in the sidewalk on a key pedestrian route above widening the sidewalk in an area that has narrow sidewalks.
  • While detailed cost information will not be available for each proposed project, using general cost to prioritize projects will elevate those with a lower order-of-magnitude cost per mile. For example, general cost would prioritize a neighborhood bicycle route using sharrows, wayfinding signage, and traffic calming treatments above a protected bicycle lane project that might require rebuilding the street.

How do we decide what to do first? Where do we spend our limited funds?

You have 15 points to assign and you can assign up to 5 points per category. Use the sliders to assign points to each prioritization option.

Safety

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Demand/Access

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Equity

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System Completeness

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General Cost

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Total Spent: 0/15

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Next steps

Over the next three months, our team will be working to complete the inventory, develop projects with appropriate treatments, and prioritize the pedestrian and bicycle system needs in Beaverton. We will hold another virtual open house in April, so please sign up for our email list below to receive notice.

In the meantime, don't forget to use the Ride Report app as you bicycle around Beaverton. It will help us learn from your experiences and target improvements where they are needed most!

Comments are no longer being accepted through this site, though you can submit feedback through the project webpage.

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Project timeline

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  • Project timeline

    Project timeline

For More Information

Final Questions

Do you live in the City of Beaverton? (Check one.)
Do you work or go to school in the City of Beaverton? (Check one.)
How did you hear about this online open house? (Check all that apply.)

Mailing list (Optional)

Provide the following optional contact information if you would like to be added to the project mailing list.

Demographic Information (Optional)

This information can help us evaluate the effectiveness of our public outreach activities and tell us if we are reaching a representative cross-section of our community. The identity of individuals is kept confidential. The results are reported as totals only, and used solely to help improve future community engagement. Providing this information is voluntary and optional.

With which gender do you identify? (Check one.)
What is your total annual household income? (Check one.)
What languages do you speak at home? (Check all that apply.)
What is your race/ethnicity? (Check all that apply.)
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